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I am delighted to reveal that under the current King Abduallah, that Saudi women are seeing an improvement in life. Although there is a long way to go, there is great hope that change is coming. Also, I'd like to let readers know that I am currently working with Princess Sultana and one of my publishers on the 4th book on Princess Sultana. It should be published fall More news to follow! View all 80 comments.


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Every once in a while I try to read something that is "deeper" than my usual smutty romance selections. This was one of those books. I listened to the Audible version and I could not pull myself away from the plight of Princess Sultana Al Sa'ud and the other women from this story.

Her story offered a poignant look at what life is like for women in Saudi Arabia. Even the wealthiest and most "privileged" women are not spared the cruelty of the misogynistic and oppressive culture. Women are treated Every once in a while I try to read something that is "deeper" than my usual smutty romance selections. Women are treated as property to be "owned" and managed by men. They are traded like cattle and punished for perceived infractions in cruel ways. From birth, girls are treated as second-class citizens, a disappointment to their family and inferior to all males.

This was highlighted by Princess Sultana's accounts of growing up with a spoiled and sadistic younger brother. No matter what he did, she would always be wrong. Time and time again, she was forced to be subservient to him, no matter how egregious his behavior was. Sexual abuse is also rampant in the world that Princess Sultana described. Young girls are forced to marry much older men, while older wives are forced to take a backseat while their husbands forsake them for their younger brides.

Young or old, there is no bright side for the wives. While the girls "virtue" is fiercely guarded -- their body sacred until such time as their father or other male guardian decides to gift it to another -- the boys and men engage in a variety of depraved sexual acts. One especially disturbing scene tells the story of a trip to Egypt where Sultana's brother and other men commit acts of extreme sexual violence.


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It was absolutely heartbreaking and terrifying. More than anything, I couldn't get past the unfairness of the situation. These women had no power or control in their lives. It is so far removed from the life I'm luck enough to lead that it was unfathomable to me. The indifference and cruelty of the men also took me aback. The often barbaric punishments they doled out seemed to be the norm.

The life of the females was valued so little that they could be extinguished with scant more concern than one would have when swatting a fly. It was unimaginable to me. Not surprisingly, this book was pretty depressing. The life lead by these women was grim, even as they tried to make the most of the little joy they could find in the absence of the men.

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Much of the content was upsetting and discouraging. That being said, I still think that this is a book that everyone should read. It will anger and sadden you. However, turning a blind eye to atrocities like the ones that play out on the pages of this book does not make the reality go away. Raising awareness is important in order to facilitate change -- and change is necessary. Yet again, I am reminded of how blessed I am for the life I was born into.

View all 43 comments. First of all, I do not believe that this work is a genuine autobiography of a Saudi princess. It just doesn't make sense to not reveal the name for 'protecting the identity of the author' after giving such a detailed life story and other intimate details about her family structure and other stuff. It is naive to assume that she would not be caught and put to death. I guess, maybe it could be the story of the maid of the Princess or something. Nevertheless I found it to be a highly compelling rea First of all, I do not believe that this work is a genuine autobiography of a Saudi princess.

Nevertheless I found it to be a highly compelling read and I believe most of the cruel, barbaric traditions and suffocating rules mentioned in this book are unfortunately true. I had stayed in that terrible place for two years and during that period, I was appalled by their religious extremism and zero tolerance to other religions. But after reading this book I realize they not only spit upon other religions but also treat their own women like shit. Some of the experiences mentioned are so heart wrenching I am amazed how a human being can treat another another human being in such absolute cruelty and be so merciless.

This book is definitely not an easy read but it would give you a pretty accurate insight about inner workings of the Saudi society and about the wretched status of their women. View all 10 comments. As a person who had spent some time in Saudi Arabia as an expatriate, I can say that many elements of this book had indeed lived up to match some of my experiences there.

However, it should be noted with caution that this is a tale that spans many years: back from the time when Saudi Arabia is slowly opening itself up to embrace the world and modernization. The country that I came to, live in and left a few years back was a stark contrast to the hear-say and media portrayal of late. In fact, I w As a person who had spent some time in Saudi Arabia as an expatriate, I can say that many elements of this book had indeed lived up to match some of my experiences there.

In fact, I was surprised of how much improved things are in a rather conservative country. Things have changed for sure. It should be noted that this was a tale being told from the perspective of a Princess, and rewritten by the author. Thus, it is hard to read this book without sensing a tinge of bias especially me knowing her central theme. Or, of how much the story had been rewritten to create a more shocking drama. You be the judge of the story. Another caution: it is easy to link the injustice, cruelty and oppression depicted in the book, to Muslims and even Islam by first glance.

Islam is a religion of the many people around various places in this earth. Saudi Arabia being its birth place - and that's all. Culture varies between one group of people to another, but that does not mean that the religion bear the burden of misinterpretation. As much as one expect this book to linger so much on elements of faith and religion - it actually dwells more on culture and human value. By all means, it is not to say that Sasson invoke the sentiment in this book.

She exhibit great respect for the religion and said so many times through the character and by herself. At pages, the book makes a good read. The stories are short, yet engaging enough to grip you for hours. Shocking, sickening at times and sometimes just plain beautiful. Revelation after revelation, which while seems extraordinarily unbelievable, is also true.

Saudi Arabia is a beautiful country and the people are kind. This book didn't really focus much on that, and misses a lot on the good parts. Much have to be learned of he life of the common people. Aug 26, Raven and Beez rated it did not like it.

Blonerd / PRINCESS (JEAN P. SASSON)

Read on the blog!! Okay, I might be way too harsh with this review but that's only because I have never hated a book more than this one right here. So here goes my rant. This book is said to be about Sultana Not real name who is a Saudi Princess and even though she belongs to the royal family she is bound by strict rules that define that women are only used for sexual relief and to bear the children for their husbands. And how they are enslaved by their fathers, husbands and brothers.

First of Read on the blog!! First of all, what kind of a person who belongs to a family of famous people would want such intimidate details of her life story which is different than others, obviously! Secondly, how is it possible that when such details were put in a book for everyone to read, how did her family not find it out?

The facts in the book are obvious enough for anyone to understand that it's fake. Fact 1: She said that she wasn't allowed to go into the mosque. Being a Saudi Princess she should have known that Mosques have a separate section for women. Fact 2: It's said that women were forced to marry after puberty. I agree that women were and in some places still are being made to marry men right after maturation. But it was to avoid going around and having sex before marriage as doing that is unlawful in Islam.

But but but I have heard that it's mentioned in the Quran the holy book of Muslims that it is the woman who gets to decide when and whom she wants to marry. Remember that it's always the humans who twist rules to fit their requirement. Fact 3: Woman are given the highest respect in Islam. Women are told to cover themselves so as not to attract the attention of unwanted men but men are not even allowed to look at them with bad intentions as thinking of a bad deed is equal to doing one. And to support this fact, a quote from the Quran itself translated of course : He who is best to his wife is the best man among you.

However, I agree that polygamy is allowed in Islam but I don't think that anybody in the modern generation follows that as everyone knows that it's difficult enough to handle the expenses and lectures of one woman Fact 4: Also a father who educates a minimum of three daughters has gained a palace in Heaven. Fact 5: There is a story kind of thing that I have heard. It's about this man who asks the prophet "Who is the one worthy of more respect after Allah The god worshiped by Muslims?

The man asks one again "Who after that? Once again the man asks "And who after that? For the last time the man asks "Who after that? This does not mean that Fathers are not respected enough, they are but it's just that Mothers are held higher. There are many facts that I can go on about like the one about piercing the vagina or something which is absolutely stupid and I think that the author has just made it up but I just wanted to tell you guys that anyone who believes in this book and let's themselves be manipulated by it, Islam is not a bad religion.

It has given it's followers many rules to follow but it's for their own advantage. Like listening to music and watching movies is not allowed in Islam, it's not forbidden but it's said so as to avoid any thing that takes one away from worshiping their God. I think it's the same for Protestants I heard that like Muslims they too are supposed to cover their heads, not drink, not have sex before marriage, not worship images or idols of God, not listen to music or watch movies and not wear gold.

I accept that women are oppressed but anyone would be fool to believe that Islam is a religion that promotes it. Women of every religion are oppressed by men of different religions. Just because one man from one particular religion does so does not mean that every man of that religion does it. The same goes for Terrorism. So this is what I had to say about this book.

Since I hate this one so much I don't think I will be reading the other two that follow this one. And I won't be rating this one since I have nothing to give it, but I won't be stopping you from reading it either. You can read it for yourself and understand that it's the biggest hoax ever. Lots of hatred for the author but love and pasta for you guys, Raven View all 22 comments. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Princess is the story of a Saudi Arabian princess called Sultana for the purposes of the story.

It shows a picture of the life of a woman in the male dominated Saudi society. Her brother is treated like a god from birth while she and her sisters are subjected to whatever cruelty he desires. As Sultana gets older, she encounters more and more horror at the treatment of women. Things chance when she is betrothed to Kareem. Or do they? First of all, this was a homework assignment from my girlfrie Princess is the story of a Saudi Arabian princess called Sultana for the purposes of the story.

Princess: A True Story of Life Behind the Veil in Saudi Arabia Summary & Study Guide

First of all, this was a homework assignment from my girlfriend at the time. She and my sister in law had both read it and it raised their ire. I said I'd give it a shot, mostly because I knew it would force my brother to have to read it as well. To put it bluntly, the Saudi women go through some horrible shit. Girls being drowned in a swimming pool for disgracing the family, girls getting stoned to death, raped by their much older husbands, polygamy, etc. It's not the easy reading I'm accustomed to and has raised my awareness of the plight of women in Middle Eastern countries.

It's a good read but not a light read and definitely not for the faint of heart. View all 15 comments. Dec 30, Linda rated it it was ok. After reading this book and comments from other readers, i really feel like i need to say something regarding Islam and Muslims because I am a Muslim. To all people who read the book, don't be mislead by what you read. That is not the true picture of Islam. What is portrayed in the story is more of culture-based, not religion Islam particularly.

The way the men in the story treated their women is not what is taught in Islam. I know because I am a Muslim, living in a Muslim community. In Islam, After reading this book and comments from other readers, i really feel like i need to say something regarding Islam and Muslims because I am a Muslim. In Islam, women are respected.

In Saudi Arabia, women are treated that way because that's their culture, not because they are following the teaching of Islam. It is true that we, Muslim women, need to cover certain parts of our body. I do it and is not forced to do it. I am not denied the right to educate myself, or to work. I am an educated person, working in professional field, earning 4 figures monthly, and i am married and me and my husband shares the same responsibility in marriage. So, the point is, please don't generalise Muslims and Islam after reading this book. View all 6 comments.

Princess: A True Story of Life Behind the Veil in Saudi Arabia

Nov 28, Anastasia Kinderman rated it did not like it Recommends it for: no one. Shelves: islamic-studies. I am an American who has an interest in both Muslims and Arab countries. I got this book for Christmas. It is a very gripping story, a real page-turner. However, while reading through it I couldn't help noticing that the way the book was written just seemed It read like a novel: the way the chapters were structured, the horrifying crimes committed by the males in the story I'm Note: Comments by Jean Sasson and Friederike Monika Adsani or their fake accounts will automatically be deleted.

It read like a novel: the way the chapters were structured, the horrifying crimes committed by the males in the story I'm not saying horrible things aren't done, I just find it hard to believe that EVERY male in Saudi Arabia is basically a heartless idiot like they are portrayed in this book , and the protagonist's unavoidably American Feminist view of the things happening in her country.

I did some research and discovered that apparently the author was sued for plagiarism although, in the interests of being fair, she did win and this book has been accused of basically being a novel claiming to be the truth.

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I would have to say I agree with that assessment. It read like a novel. The covers of this book and other books by the same author all have that "fiction sensational novel" type of cover. The titles sound like novel titles. The blurbs written for this and the other books in the trilogy read like blurbs for fictional novels. If you compare it to other books written on the hardships women in the Arab world have faced you can immediately tell a difference in both the writing they do not read like entertaining sensational novels, they read like true stories of hardship and just the covers and blurbs for them other books don't have "fiction book" covers and the blurbs don't read like the blurbs for novels I had no knowledge of the controversy surrounding this book before I read it but after I was done I had enough doubts about its authenticity to research its back story.

That should tell you something. It's painfully obvious in reading through this book that it is fiction. If you are curious and wish to read this novel for yourself I recommend just getting it from your library so you in no way financially support someone who advertises fiction under the guise of truth. I have checked out her other books and it seems the author is simply attempting to profit from our curiosity about other cultures and peoples and basically slandering them in her writing. Even worse, she fills our heads with untrue stereotypes that people from these countries have to confront when they are in our country.

View all 8 comments. Oct 18, Renee rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: anyone interested in role of women in Islam. Shelves: bookclub , islam , biography. The blurbs written for this and the other books in the trilogy read like blurbs for fictional novels. If you compare it to other books written on the hardships women in the Arab world have faced you can immediately tell a difference in both the writing they do not read like entertaining sensational novels, they read like true stories of hardship and just the covers and blurbs for them other books don't have "fiction book" covers and the blurbs don't read like the blurbs for novels I had no knowledge of the controversy surrounding this book before I read it but after I was done I had enough doubts about its authenticity to research its back story.

Princess Sultana through Sasson tells a compelling story and theres plenty of sympathy to be had there. I say she was just telling her own story as a royal woman living under those specific rules. This is truly a fabulous book about the life and family of Princess Sultana. Princess Sultana reveals the darker side of the lives of many women in Saudi. A game of baseball as played by T.

Eliot and Wilem "Big Ball" de Kooning. A recipe suitable for feeding sixty park-e Imprisoned for 'inflammatory writings' by the totalitarian Theocracy, shy intellectual Ashleigh Trine figures his sto Will Self has one of literature's most astonishing imaginations, and in How the Dead Live his talent has come to full This is the territory charted in "Fresh. The Princess Trilogy. Princess: A True Story of Life Behind the Veil in Saudi Arabia Hidden behind her black floor-length veil, she is a prisoner, jailed by her father, her husband, her sons, and her country.

Download eBook. Read Online. That Summer in Sicily The Teachings of Don B She has no freedom, no control over her own life, no value but as a bearer of sons. Hidden behind her black floor-length veil, she is a prisoner, jailed by her father, her husband, her sons, and her country. Sultana is a member of the Saudi royal family, closely related to the king. For the sake of her daughters, she has decided to take the risk of speaking out about the life of women in her country, regardless of their rank.

She must hide her identity for fear that the religous leaders in her country would call for her death to punish her honesty.